Frequently Asked Questions about Home Inspections (FAQ’s)

Home inspections for condominiums

Definitely. Now you can complete your home purchase with confidence. You’ll have learned many things about your new home from the inspector’s written report, and will have that information for future reference.

No house is perfect. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn’t mean you should or shouldn’t buy the house, only that you will know about the condition. If your budget is tight, or if you don’t want to become involved in future repair work, this information will be important to you. If major problems are found, a seller may agree to make repairs.

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While it’s not required that you be present for the inspection, it is highly recommended. You will be able to observe the inspector and ask questions as you learn about the condition of the home and how to maintain it.

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Typically, a home inspector is contacted immediately after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed. Before you sign, be sure there is an inspection clause in the sales contract, making your final purchase obligation contingent on the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms and conditions to which both the buyer and seller are obligated.

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InterNACHI, the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors, is the world’s largest inspection trade association. Based in the United States, InterNACHI is both non-profit and federally tax-exempt, and operates in 65 different countries and nine languages. InterNACHI is the inspection industry’s largest provider of education and training. InterNACHI has been awarded more than 1,400 governmental approvals and accreditations. InterNACHI Members conduct inspections in accordance with the InterNACHI Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics, which prohibits engaging in conflict-of-interest activities that might compromise their objectivity.

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You can ask friends or business acquaintances to recommend a home inspector they have used. Also, real estate agents and brokers are familiar with the services you will need and may be able to provide you with a list of names from which to choose.

Whatever your referral source, you can be assured of your home inspector’s commitment to professional standards and business ethics by choosing one who has membership in InterNACHI.

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No. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of a house. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value. It is not a municipal inspection, which verifies local code compliance. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what components and systems may need major repair or replacement.

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Even the most experienced homeowner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector. An inspector is familiar with the elements of home construction, proper installation, maintenance and home safety. He or she knows how the home’s systems and components are intended to function together, as well as why they fail.

Some inspection services, Wind Mitigation and Four Point for example, are only accepted by insurance companies when performed by a licensed professional.

Above all, most buyers find it difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may influence their judgment. For accurate information, it is best to obtain an impartial, third-party opinion by a professional in the field of home inspection.

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The inspection fee for a typical one-family house varies geographically, as does the cost of housing. Similarly, within a given area, the inspection fee may vary depending on several factors such as the size of the house, its age and possible optional inspection services.

Do not let cost be a factor in deciding whether to have a home inspection or in the selection of your home inspector. The sense of security and knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost. Use the inspector’s qualifications, including experience, training, compliance with state regulations and professional affiliations as a guide.

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If you are planning to sell your home, a home inspection can give you the opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

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Buying a home could be the largest single investment you will ever make. To minimize unpleasant surprises and unexpected difficulties, you’ll want to learn as much as you can about the house before you buy it. A home inspection may identify the need for major repairs or builder oversights, as well as the need for maintenance to keep it in good condition. Some lenders or insurance companies may require a home inspection. After the inspection, you will know more about the house, which will allow you to make decisions with confidence.

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A home inspection is an objective visual examination, performed by a professional, of the physical structure and systems of a house, from the roof to the foundation.

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The standard home inspector’s report will cover the condition of the home’s roof, attic and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation and structural components. The heating system; central air conditioning system (temperature permitting); interior plumbing and electrical systems. The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) publishes a Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics that outlines what you should expect to be covered in your home inspection report.

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"Before you invest, best inspect!"

Prior to Purchase Inspection

Information about Prior to Purchase Inspection The Best Inspect Prior to Purchase Home Inspection is a thorough, accurate and unbiased assessment of the property, structure and systems. Best Inspect has the knowledge and expertise to provide you with...
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Wind Mitigation Inspection

Information about Wind Mitigation Inspection This inspection is generally required by all insurance companies with the purchase of a home. The report covers seven different aspects of your homes construction and features. The inspection will identify the following...
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Four Point
Inspection

Information about Four Point Inspection This inspection covers four main components of the home. These include:

1. Roof
2. Plumbing system
3. Electrical system
4. Heating and Air systems (HVAC)...
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Roof Certification Inspection

Information about Roof Certification Inspection This inspection is confined to the roof and will identify the following:

1. The type of roof covering material.
2. The age of the roof.
3. The remaining useful life of the roof.
4. The overall condition of the roof....
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Maintenance Inspection

Information about Maintenance Inspection Inspection This inspection is essentially the same as a Prior to Purchase Home Inspection, but the inspection is done for you as the current owner. Maybe you have been in your home for several years, and you may or may not have had the home inspected at the time you purchased it....
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Warranty Inspection

Information about Warranty Inspection Inspection This inspection is essentially the same as a Warranty Inspection, but is more specifically targeted at identifying items that are covered under your Home Warranty Plan. Even if you did not purchase your home new, maybe you purchased a Warranty Plan...
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Repairs Inspection

Information about Repairs Inspection Inspection This inspection is commonly referred to as a Re-Inspect. Whenever a Best Inspect Report recommends repairs it is in your best interest to have the repairs inspected to ensure they were done completely and correctly...
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